Angola

The people of Angola are stoics. They have a deep understanding of patience, and avoid blaming the difficulties the country faces on the fact that there was war. In fact, Angolans behave as if there was no war although it is deep-rooted in every Angolan. Music is the heart and soul of every Angolan, it can be heard anywhere and they use anything as an excuse to party. The country has a wide range of music, mainly Kuduro, Kizomba, Semba, and Tarrachinha, the latter being more sensual than all the others. In all, it is safe to say that Angolans are fun and loving people with a thirst for more of what life has to give.

A very low percentage of the local population can communicate in English. Traveling in Angola, therefore, requires a minimum of knowledge of the Portuguese language. Also, due to the fact that lots of people migrate from neighbouring countries to Angola, it is sometimes possible to use French and Afrikaans (for Namibian / South African people).

There is little literature on Angola available at all, and most of the available literature is in Portuguese or (in some cases) French. Bay of Tigers: An Odyssey through War-torn Angola by Pedro Rosa Mendes was translated from the Portuguese and published by Harcourt in 2003. Mendes traveled across the country by train in 1997 while the war was still going on in Angola, it’s a very fascinating look at the people and the nature of life there during the war.

Try also John Frederick Walker’s “A Certain Curve OF Horn”, documenting the history of the magnificent and sub species of Antelope unique to Angola – “Palanca Negra Gigante” (Hippotragus níger variani).

Another excellent read is Ryszard Kapuściński’s compelling journalistic narrative Another Day of Life in which he reports on the chaotic period leading up to Angola’s independence from Portugal in 1975. As one of the only journalists in Angola during this very dangerous period, his perspective is rare and full of insight. (source: Wikitravel)

 

 

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