Madagascar

Understand

While Madagascar is an island in the Indian Ocean, it was originally settled by people of Indonesian and African descent, which you can clearly see when you look at the inhabitants. Others have suggested that the people of Madagascar descended from Indonesians and Africans who mixed before their arrival on the isolated island, but studies prove people of Madagascar came from Borneo and Africa. It is not fully known how the inhabitants came there or if they were there already.

Only later did Arabs, Indians, and Chinese immigrants mix into the population of the island. The Malagasy way of thinking is a mixture of cultures, as well as their appearance and fashion style. It is a melting pot. Madagascar is part of the African Union, which is now being reconsidered due to the recent 2009 political turmoil. That said. it is essential to the people of Madagascar that tourism continues to thrive. And there is no reason why it should not. There is no violence related to the political crisis and certainly nothing a tourist needs to concern themselves with.

Talk

The remarkable thing about Madagascar is that the entire island speaks one language:¬†Malagasy, an Austronesian language. As well as being the name of the language, “Malagasy” also refers to the people of the island. Because the island is so large there are many different dialects. The Merina dialect is the “Official Malagasy” of the island and is spoken around highlands of Antananarivo. Most Malagasy, however, speak Merina across the island. Madagascar is very humid.

French is the second official language of Madagascar. The government and large corporations use French in everyday business, but 75-85% of Malagasy only have limited proficiency in this language. Attempts by foreigners to learn and speak Malagasy are liked and even encouraged by the Malagasy people.

The third official language is English, though very few people speak English. It became an official language in 2007. Since then it is becoming more common to find locals speaking the language. (source: Wikitravel)

 

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