Bhutan

 

Besides the stunning natural scenery, the enduring image of the country for most visitors is the strong sense of culture and tradition that binds the kingdom and clearly distinguishes it from its larger neighbors. Bhutan is the only Vajrayana Buddhist nation in the world, and the profound teachings of this tradition remain well-preserved and exert a strong influence in all aspects of life. Due to its pristine environment and harmonious society, the tiny Kingdom of Bhutan has been called “The Last Shangrila.”

Talk

Common Languages

  • Dzongkha. The mother tongue of most people residing in Western Bhutan, and the kingdom’s official language.
  • Sharchopkha. The major regional language spoken in Eastern Bhutan.
  • Bumthangkha. Similar to Sharchopkha – spoken in the Bumthang region.
  • Nepali. Most people of the borders used to use Nepali language.
  • English and Hindi. Both languages are understood by most people in urban areas.

Usage

  • La. The suffix ‘la’ is an honorific, and many Bhutanese feel that their remarks sound too harsh if it is not used, and this carries over even into English. So, don’t be surprised if you hear expressions such as “Yes-la” or “I’m not sure-la”. It just implies respect.
  • Reach. In Bhutan, the verb ‘reach’ means to ‘take’ or ‘accompany’ (a person). For example: “I’ll reach you to the bus station” means “I’ll take/accompany you to the bus station.”
  • Cousin-brother, Cousin-sister. Extended families living under one roof are common in Bhutan. As a result, the dividing line between siblings and cousins is blurred, and so it is not uncommon to be introduced to a “cousin-brother” or “cousin-sister”. Although these people are just cousins, the English word implies a more distant relationship than is the fact in Bhutan.

(source: Wikitravel)

 

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